Jnanapravaha | think critical. think art.

Upcoming Programmes

01
JUL Onwards
Theoretical Foundations
Interpretive Methods
Rohit Goel

Past Programmes

28
APR
Indian Aesthetics
Reading between the Lines
Abhijit Dandekar
24
APR
Community Engagement
The Gateways into Western India
Kurush F. Dalal
20
APR
Community Engagement
Mountstuart Elphinstone Conference
21
APR
Indian Aesthetics
Stones, Stories, Science
Mrinalini Rajagopalan

   << May - 2017 >>

 
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Venue

Jnanapravaha
Queens Mansion, 3rd Floor, G. Talwatkar Marg, Fort, Mumbai - 400001. India.
E-mail: to.jnanapravaha@gmail.com, info@jp-india.org
Tel      : +91-22-2207 2974 / 2207 2975
Landmark: We are next to Cathedral Middle School, in the lane opposite J.B.Petit School.

 

 
 

Islamic Aethetics

Certificate Course in Islamic Aethetics: In Praise of Aj'aib, the Wondrous


Course Description

The endless inventiveness of Islamic Art, evidenced in paradisiacal imagery and ornamentation, produces forms of expression that celebrate the splendour and sublimity of Allah’s creation and testify to the tradition, ‘Verily, God is Beauty and loves that which is beautiful’. Manifestations of faith and an environmental quest of radiant magnificence can be seen in architecture and design which are not only exemplary of sophisticated urbanism but also of the unique absorption and integration of disparate cultural forms. The language of Islamic Art, its aesthetics and its syntax, can thus be summed up as at once heavenly and earthly.

 

In January 2017, Jnanapravaha Mumbai is pleased to offer a new certificate course in Islamic Aesthetics:

 

WORD AND IMAGE FROM THE DECCAN TO MUGHAL COURTS :
INDO-ISLAMIC AESTHETICS, CA. 1400-1800
Vivek Gupta (American Numismatic Society)
Dates : 4th, 5th, & 6th January 2017

From Sufi shrines in the medieval Deccan to illustrated manuscripts made for the Mughal nobility, interpreting Indo-Islamic works of art and architecture involve bending the norms of established Indian, Persianate, or Islamic aesthetic systems. How do we interpret buildings, paintings, and objects made in Indo-Islamic contexts? How do the meanings of these works shift over time? This series of lectures offers three distinct case studies-of a monument, illustrated manuscript, and large-scale warfare artillery-where the reading of a literary text facilitates our interpretation. Likewise, the visual evidence reflects back on the reading of the text. Word and image thus become interdependent evincing a deeply rich interpretive process.


Timing

6.30 pm


Registration

INR 3000

COURT AND COSMOS: THE GREAT AGE OF THE SELJUQS
Sheila Canby (Metropolitan Museum of Art)
Dates : 9th January 2017

This lecture will focus on a range of exceptional artworks produced in Iran, Anatolia, Iraq and Syria during the period of the Seljuq Turks and their immediate successors, from 1038 to 1307. Court and Cosmos: The Great Age of the Seljuqs, based on a recent exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum, will discuss the themes of Seljuq art and how they were influenced by the exchange and synthesis of diverse traditions-including Turkmen, Perso-Arabo-Islamic, Byzantine, Armenian, Crusader, and other Christian cultures.


Timing

6.30 pm


Registration

INR 500

MATERIAL CULTURE FROM THE EARLY MODERN DECCAN
Pushkar Sohoni (Indian Institute of Science Education and Research)
Dates : 10th, 11th & 12th January 2017

For the Deccan, the 16th century was a formative period that marked the end of the Bahmani dynasty and the kingdom of VIjayanagara. The new emergent forces were the Nizam Shahs of Ahmadnagar, Adil Shahs of Bijapur, and the Qutb Shahs of Golconda, along with the expansionist Mughals from the north and the Portuguese at sea. In a period of over a hundred years, the three major sultanates made significant cultural contributions, being healthy patrons of architecture and art, while promoting high learning. The material culture of the 16th century Deccan was unique, and did not survive the arrival of the Mughals. In these lectures, material culture of all scales, from coins to urban settlements, will be discussed, and the deeper meanings of several visual forms investigated.


Timing

6.30 pm


Registration

INR 3000

TEMPLE AND MOSQUE: READING REGIONAL CONSTRUCTION PRACTICES
The Deccan Heritage Foundation, India, Mirella Petteni Haggiag, Annual Lecture
Pushkar Sohoni (Indian Institute of Science Education and Research)
Dates:13th January 2017

Regional construction habits transcend patronage and faith. As two monuments in the region of Aurangabad demonstrate, received architectural designs were misinterpreted by local artisans, whose building traditions had not encountered such construction requirements before. The temple at Anwa and the Jami mosque in Daulatabad share some odd constructional details that reveal the handiwork of local guilds.


Timing

6.30 pm


Registration

INR 500 (Funds will be given for restoration in the Deccan)

TURNING TURK? ISLAMIC TEXTILES AND ISLAMICATE DRESS IN MEDIEVAL GEORGIA AND LADAKH
Irina Koshoridze (Tbilisi State University) and Finbarr Barry Flood (NYU)
Dates : 14th January 2017

The medieval churches and church treasuries of the Republic Georgia in the Caucasus preserve a rich array of spectacular Islamic silks. Many also contain wall-paintings depicting Georgian elites wearing modes of dress once associated with the Turkic dynasties that dominated the central Islamic lands during the eleventh and twelfth centuries. The proliferation of such modes of elite self-representation was a truly transregional phenomenon: during the same period, wall-paintings from Ladakh, western Tibet, show local Buddhist elites wearing Turkic robes of similar form.

In both regions, the robes worn by depicted elites bear arm-bands containing inscriptions or pseudo-inscriptions written in angular Kufic script. Such inscribed bands seem closely related to the epigraphic tiraz textiles well-known from the eastern Islamic world. The near contemporary appearance of Christian and Buddhist elites dwelling on the western and eastern extremities of the mountainous northern frontier of the Islamic world in Turkic dress raises a series of important questions regarding the relationship between royal self-representations, Islamic textiles, medieval sartorial practices, and their role in the formation and presentation of elite identities.


Timing

5.30 pm


Registration

INR 500

DOES ISLAM HAVE AN “IMAGE PROBLEM”? PERSPECTIVES FROM EUROPEAN HISTORY
Finbarr Barry Flood (New York University)
Dates : 14th January 2017

The idea that Islam fosters distinctive, and often negative, attitudes towards figurative imagery is wide-spread and pervasive. Recent controversies about Islam, aniconism and iconoclasm are typical in this respect, often taking the idea of an essential and monolithic Islamic Bilderverbot(image prohibition) as a given. Seen from the perspective of the longue durée, however, this idea of an “image problem” in Islam is only partly informed by knowledge or understanding of beliefs and practices that are internal to Islam. Representations of Islam produced by non-Muslims over more than a millennium have been no less important to the perception, perhaps even creation, of an Islamic Bilderverbot. This persistent idea should, therefore, be analyzed not only in light of the tenets of Islam, but also in relation to histories of the representation of Islamic cultures. Surveying European representations of Islam and Muslim from the medieval period to modernity, this lecture will demonstrate their relevance to the current reinvestment of the image as a perceived locus of cultural difference in debates about Islam, secularism and European identity. It will suggest that recent acts of iconoclasm carried out by extremist groups such as Islamic State/Daesh are not comprehensible as part of a history of internal debates about the acceptability of figurative images in Islam alone, but also actively exploit essentialist and Orientalist notions of an essentially Islamic image prohibition.


Timing

7.00 pm


Registration

INR 500

 
 

Admission Requirements

  • A copy of your last degree certificate
  • A copy of your complete bio-data
  • One passport size photograph
 

Fees :

Participants can opt for individual programmes based on the fees mentioned above, or they can opt for the course in its entirety.


Those opting to attend the entire programme will be offered a special registration fee of INR 7000/-, and will be eligible for a certificate of attendance.

 

How to Apply

You are required to submit one passport size photograph, photocopies of your bio and last degree certificate at our centre after filling in the enrollment form. Course fees are accepted in cash, or cheque in favor of 'Jnanapravaha'.

 
 
 
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Jnanapravaha
Queens Mansion, 3rd Floor, G. Talwatkar Marg,
Fort, Mumbai - 400001. India.
Tel: +91-22-2207 2974 / 2207 2975.
Fax: +91-22-2207 2976.
Email: to.jnanapravaha@gmail.com,
info@jp-india.org

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